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It simply means counter-clockwise but must sound really strange to you chaps! Arse about face - This means you are doing something back to front. Usually in the advanced stages of drunken stupor, someone would be considered "completely arseholed". As well - You chaps say also when we would say "too" or "as well".Arse over elbow - This is another way of saying head over heels but is a little more descriptive. For instance if my friend ordered a Miller Lite, I would say "I'll have one as well".

It is simply an exclamation of surprise, short for "Blow me down", meaning something like I am so surprised you could knock me over just by blowing. If you spotted a scrummy girly in a bar you might try to chat her up. Cheeky - "Eee you cheeky monkey" was what my mother said to me all the time when I was a kid.

Cheeky means you are flippant, have too much lip or are a bit of a smart arse! It refers to the way a story gets changed as is passes from one person to the next so that the end result may be completely different from what was originally said. Chivvy along - When I'm standing patiently in the checkout queue at Tesco I like to chivvy along the old ladies in front of me.

Aggro - Short for aggravation, it's the sort of thing you might expect at a football match. There is sometimes aggro in the cities after the pubs shut! - This is used a lot around London and the south to mean, "Hello, how are you"?

Anti-clockwise - The first time I said that something had gone anti-clockwise to someone in Texas I got this very funny look. It is used in phrases like "pain in the arse" (a nuisance) or I "can't be arsed" (I can't be bothered) or you might hear something was "a half arsed attempt" meaning that it was not done properly.

For example a computer program might be bespoken for a client, or you may order a bespoke holiday, where the travel agent creates an itinerary around your exact requirements. Bladdered - This rather ugly expression is another way of saying you are drunk. Blatant - We use this word a lot to mean something is really obvious. You'll hear people say "bleeding hell" or "not bleeding likely" for example. My Dad used to say "Gawd Blimey" or "Gor Blimey" or even "Cor Blimey". Blinding - If something is a blinding success - it does not mean that any eyes were poked out with sharp sticks - it means it was awesome. For example if you are telling someone how to make that fabulous banoffee pie you just served them, you would tell them to boil the condensed milk for three hours, spread it onto a basic cheesecake base, slice bananas on top, add some whipped double cream, another layer of banana and Bob's your uncle! Surprisingly it is also used in a positive manner to describe something that is the best, in which case you would describe it as being "the dog's bollocks". In the US the meaning would be almost exactly the reverse. Usually when he hit his thumb or dropped a nail or lost something. You might also bum around, if you are doing nothing in particular, just hanging out. Butchers - To have a butchers at something is to have a look.

Best of British - If someone says "The best of British to you" when you are visiting the UK, it simply means good luck. Blinkered - Someone who is blinkered is narrow minded or narrow sighted - they only see one view on a subject. Constant source of amusement to us Brits when you guys talk about blowing people off. Blunt - If a saw or a knife is not sharp we say it is blunt. Englishmen who live in America take great delight in ordering specialised registration plates for their cars using the letters B. Today we might use the sh** or the f*** words but bugger is still as common. It can also be used to tell someone to get lost (bugger off), or to admit defeat (we're buggered) or if you were tired or exhausted you would be buggered. When I won £10 on the lottery my mate called me a "lucky bugger". Finally to bum something means to scrounge it from someone. For example a street trader might bung something in for free if you pay cash right now! This is a cockney rhyming slang word that has become common.

Generally you are considered to be a bit cheeky if you have an answer for everything and always have the last word. Or in the north "tara" which is pronounced sort of like "churar". If only they would stop fannying around and hurry up!

My licence plate on my MX5 (Miata in American) was CHEEKY, which most Texans thought was something to do with bottoms - wrong!! Cheers - This word is obviously used when drinking with friends. For example when saying goodbye you could say "cheers", or "cheers then". Americans could use it in English pubs, but should avoid the other situations as it sounds wrong with an American accent. Cheesed off - This is a polite way of saying you are pissed off with something. Chuffed - You would be chuffed to bits if you were really pleased about something. - This expression brings back memories of being a kid and stealing apples from people's gardens. It means you are talking out of your butt and has nothing to do with any kind of dessert! Cockney rhyming slang - There are lots of words that make up cockney rhyming slang.

It comes from when horses that pulled carriages wore blinkers to stop them seeing to the side or behind them which stopped them from being startled and only let them see where they were going. Something may be "bloody marvellous" or "bloody awful". Americans should avoid saying "bloody" as they sound silly. You might hear someone say "not blooming likely" so that they don't have to swear. Bugger all - If something costs bugger all, it means that it costs nothing. The reason "butchers" means a look even though it doesn't rhyme is because it is short for "butchers hook" and "hook" of course, does rhyme. Our official protestant church - of which the Queen is the head.

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